The Karen-Padaung women display their beauty, and their status as married women, by wearing carved elephant tusk in their ears. When a woman is married, her ears are pierced and an elephant tusk of one to four centimetres in length is inserted.

The Karen-Padaung women display their beauty, and their status as married women, by wearing carved elephant tusk in their ears. When a woman is married, her ears are pierced and an elephant tusk of one to four centimetres in length is inserted.

 The Padaung's famous long-necked women wear brass coils around their necks. A symbol of wealth, position and beauty, the coils can stretch their necks over a foot and weigh over 20 pounds (9kg).

The Padaung's famous long-necked women wear brass coils around their necks. A symbol of wealth, position and beauty, the coils can stretch their necks over a foot and weigh over 20 pounds (9kg).

 The coils are made from brass and gold alloy. Because long necked women can't lean their head's back, they must use straws in order to drink.

The coils are made from brass and gold alloy. Because long necked women can't lean their head's back, they must use straws in order to drink.

 The rings may appear cumbersome, but the Padaungs believe that beauty lies in a long neck, which is regarded as graceful as a swan's. The tradition of wearing bronze rings round the neck is slowly being discarded but there are still a few who continue to follow this age-old custom.

The rings may appear cumbersome, but the Padaungs believe that beauty lies in a long neck, which is regarded as graceful as a swan's. The tradition of wearing bronze rings round the neck is slowly being discarded but there are still a few who continue to follow this age-old custom.

Kayan (5 of 12).jpg
 A young Karen-Padaung girl is weaving inside the refugee camp near the city of Nai Soi in the Mae Hong Son Province of Thailand.

A young Karen-Padaung girl is weaving inside the refugee camp near the city of Nai Soi in the Mae Hong Son Province of Thailand.

 A young Karen-Padaung girl looks in her mirror while putting on make up.

A young Karen-Padaung girl looks in her mirror while putting on make up.

Kayan (3 of 12).jpg
 At about the age of 6, girls are allowed to choose whether or not to put on the rings. Wearers say that they are not uncomfortable, although their weight forces the shoulders down, making the neck look longer.

At about the age of 6, girls are allowed to choose whether or not to put on the rings. Wearers say that they are not uncomfortable, although their weight forces the shoulders down, making the neck look longer.

Kayan (9 of 12).jpg
 A young Karen-Padaung girl shows the brass loops around her legs. Leg loops can weigh up to 30 pounds and force the women to waddle when they walk and sit straight legged.

A young Karen-Padaung girl shows the brass loops around her legs. Leg loops can weigh up to 30 pounds and force the women to waddle when they walk and sit straight legged.

Kayan (7 of 12).jpg
 The Karen-Padaung women display their beauty, and their status as married women, by wearing carved elephant tusk in their ears. When a woman is married, her ears are pierced and an elephant tusk of one to four centimetres in length is inserted.
 The Padaung's famous long-necked women wear brass coils around their necks. A symbol of wealth, position and beauty, the coils can stretch their necks over a foot and weigh over 20 pounds (9kg).
 The coils are made from brass and gold alloy. Because long necked women can't lean their head's back, they must use straws in order to drink.
 The rings may appear cumbersome, but the Padaungs believe that beauty lies in a long neck, which is regarded as graceful as a swan's. The tradition of wearing bronze rings round the neck is slowly being discarded but there are still a few who continue to follow this age-old custom.
Kayan (5 of 12).jpg
 A young Karen-Padaung girl is weaving inside the refugee camp near the city of Nai Soi in the Mae Hong Son Province of Thailand.
 A young Karen-Padaung girl looks in her mirror while putting on make up.
Kayan (3 of 12).jpg
 At about the age of 6, girls are allowed to choose whether or not to put on the rings. Wearers say that they are not uncomfortable, although their weight forces the shoulders down, making the neck look longer.
Kayan (9 of 12).jpg
 A young Karen-Padaung girl shows the brass loops around her legs. Leg loops can weigh up to 30 pounds and force the women to waddle when they walk and sit straight legged.
Kayan (7 of 12).jpg

The Karen-Padaung women display their beauty, and their status as married women, by wearing carved elephant tusk in their ears. When a woman is married, her ears are pierced and an elephant tusk of one to four centimetres in length is inserted.

The Padaung's famous long-necked women wear brass coils around their necks. A symbol of wealth, position and beauty, the coils can stretch their necks over a foot and weigh over 20 pounds (9kg).

The coils are made from brass and gold alloy. Because long necked women can't lean their head's back, they must use straws in order to drink.

The rings may appear cumbersome, but the Padaungs believe that beauty lies in a long neck, which is regarded as graceful as a swan's. The tradition of wearing bronze rings round the neck is slowly being discarded but there are still a few who continue to follow this age-old custom.

A young Karen-Padaung girl is weaving inside the refugee camp near the city of Nai Soi in the Mae Hong Son Province of Thailand.

A young Karen-Padaung girl looks in her mirror while putting on make up.

At about the age of 6, girls are allowed to choose whether or not to put on the rings. Wearers say that they are not uncomfortable, although their weight forces the shoulders down, making the neck look longer.

A young Karen-Padaung girl shows the brass loops around her legs. Leg loops can weigh up to 30 pounds and force the women to waddle when they walk and sit straight legged.

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